Bridget Riley @ Museum für Gegenwartskunst Siegen, Germany

Bridget Riley @ Museum für Gegenwartskunst Siegen, Germany

Bridget Riley was recently awarded the prestigious Reubens prize and in honour of that The Museum für Gegenwartskunst Siegen, Germany is holding an exhibition of her work.  The pieces on display are from 1980 onwards and take up 12 rooms of the museum.  The exhibition runs from 1st July through to 11th November 2012.  It goes without saying that if you are anywhere near Seigen, this is one that should not be missed.

 “Bridget Riley herself conceptualized the exhibition in the Museum für Gegenwartskunst Siegen, which features work groups from 1980 on. In these groups of works, various strategies of lining up and intertwining stripes, rhomboid and curved figures, but also circles are presented. Riley has chosen a special form of presentation. By positioning juxtapositions of two or three pictures in a total of 12 museum rooms she intensifies the effects of color and shape through comparison. The result is an exciting and invigorating visual experience. The exhibition also includes two wall-sized paintings and a drawing encompassing an entire wall.”

Address

Museum für Gegenwartskunst Siegen
Unteres Schloss 1
57072 Siegen, Germany

 

Opening hours:

Tuesday through Sunday 11 – 6
Thursday 11 – 8
Closed on Mondays
Open on holidays

Admission:

Adults: 5.90EUR
Children (sixteen and under), students, and Siegen Pass holders: 4.60EUR
Group rates for groups of 10 or more: 4.10EUR per person
Families (parents with children under age 16): 11EUR

Information:

Telephone: +49 (0) 271 405 77 0
Fax: +49 (0) 271 405 77 32
E-Mail: info/at/mgk-siegen.de

Web: http://museumfuergegenwartskunstsiegen.de/index_e.php?mid=2

Richard Anuszkiewicz @ Eire Art Museum

Richard Anuszkiewicz @ Eire Art Museum

Richard Anuszkiewicz: “Recent Paintings and Sculpture” is currently running at the Eire Art Museum, 411 State Street, Eire PA 16501 (USA).  The exhibition is housed in the main gallery and runs from July 14th through to November 25th 2012.

Anuszkiewicz was born in Eire and studied art at the Eire Technical High School under Joseph Plavcan.  Although now living in Englewood, N.J.,  Anuskiewicz, 82, maintains a strong connection with his home town.

If you are anywhere near Eire then I would strongly recommend that you go to see the work of one of the true Op Art pioneers.  Richard Anuszkiewicz’s works are held in museum collections all over the world, and he remains to this day one of America’s most revered painters.

Hours
Closed on Mondays
Tuesday – Thursday, 11 am to 5 pm
Friday, 11 am to 9 pm
Saturday, 11 am to 5 pm
Sunday, 1 pm to 5 pm

Admission
Members – Free
Adults – $7
Seniors Citizens & Students – $5
Children under 5 – Free

“When the brilliant colors and geometric precision of Op Art appeared on the art scene in the mid-1960s, Erie native Richard Anuszkiewicz was the movement’s foremost American painter. His artwork explores the relationship between color and space, creating art that subtly challenges the audience’s visual perceptions. Over the years, Anuszkiewicz’s art has evolved, but he remains committed to the principles of mathematics, architecture and color theory that have always been essential to his work.

This exhibit draws from Anuszkiewicz’s recent works and shows his progression from paintings to sculpture from the 1980s to present. “I sometimes refer to my painting as architectural, because I work out my plan, I work out my idea, and then I go about constructing the painting,” Anuszkiewicz said of his work in the 1970s. At this time he began to break out of a strictly rectangular format, creating knot-shaped and plus-sign shaped works, leading him to paint on shaped canvases. Shaped canvases gave way to painted wood, and eventually steel, constructions. Many of these works bear the title “Translumina,” and in these works, he begins to concern himself more with illusions of transparency rather than color transfer. As this series developed, a form of sculpture emerged that resembles colored drawings in the air—transparent intersecting boxes suggesting forms similar to his shaped canvases.”

Gianni Sarcone

Gianni Sarcone

Widely considered as a leading authority on visual perception, Gianni Sarcone has written numerous books on topics ranging from optical illusions through to visual and critical thinking (see below for links), so we are absolutely delighted and honoured to be able to feature some of his work on the site.

In recent years, Gianni has acted as a juror at the Third Annual “Best Visual Illusion of the Year” contest in Sarasota, Florida (USA).  In 2011 , his optical illusion project “Mask of Love” was named in the top 10 best optical illusions in the “Best Illusion of the Year Contest” (Naples, Florida, USA).

The function of art is an extension of the function of the brain – the seeking of knowledge in an ever-changing world.” (Semir Zeki)

Did you study art?

I didn’t ‘study’ art, I’ve been PRACTICING art since I was very young (around 2 years old).  I come from a family of artists: my father is a painter, my uncle was a renown sculptor, my grand-parents were painters… My youth was filled with colours, turpentine, brushes, and rich visual experiences.  Art is for me as natural as a second skin.

Why do you like Op Art?

Op Art is short for Optical Art. In fact, the essence of Op Art is to play with our optic nerves to create the illusion of colours, dimensions and motion.  Blank spaces, negative spaces, XOR spaces, interspaces, interferences, aliasing, repetitive geometric textures are the palette the Op Artist uses to create pulsating, rotating, or kinetic visual effects.

But Op Art isn’t only based on repetitive patterns that alternate optical contrasts (clear/dark, vertical/horizontal, straight/oblique, thick/thin, and so on), it is mostly a type of research that tries to achieve the maximum visual effect with the most minimal intervention. Some Op Art paintings are in fact both simple and effective.

I like Op Art because it involves a lot of study: you have first to understand how our neural mechanism of vision works, and then to unceasingly investigate new mediums and techniques in the field of visual design to achieve the best optical effects.

How do you make your art? What’s the process for making one of your artworks?

I have a very independent mind that pushes me to be creative everyday. Anything I see, read or touch, like movies, art exhibitions, newspapers, magazines, internet – while walking in the street or even when I am cooking for a crowd – are the beginnings for visual ideas. My main tool for catching these ideas is a pocket notebook I always carry with me.

I don’t make my art with a computer, software or any other material, I make it first with ideas. What interests me is the final impact. So, I don’t care about the media as such, because I am skilled in any art medium or in any old or current graphic editor.

All my work is based on the same essential principle: awaken curiosity.

Any other art you like and other artists that inspire or have inspired you.

I like in general modern art and I am very eclectic in my preferences: I appreciate Joan Mirò, Alexander Calder, Jean Tinguely, Kasimir Malevitch, Lucio Fontana, Georg Baselitz, Daniel Spoerri, and even Odilon Redon…  In short, I take inspiration from any artist who strongly puzzles me.  Besides Op Art, The Bauhaus School and Suprematism are probably the art movements that most resonate within me.

Anything else you like doing or you want to say?

I am an adept of the ‘wabi-sabi’ aesthetic, I like simplicity and raw sincerity in every branch of art. My preferred quote is: “Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.” (Antoine de Saint-Exupéry)

I am also a devoted martial artist and am an expert practitioner of Taekwondo and Ju-Jitsu.

A selection of books by Gianni Sarcone on Amazon.co.uk:

See all books by Gianni Sarcone on Amazon.co.uk
Books by Gianni Sarcone on Amazon.com
You can find out more about Gianni Sarcone and see more of his work on his website.

To see some of Gianni’s excellent Valentine’s day Op Art, see here.

Bridget Riley wins prestigious Rubens Prize

Bridget Riley wins prestigious Rubens Prize

On the 1st July, 2012, Briget Riley was awarded the prestigious Rubens Prize for her life’s work.  The Rubens Prize given to artists whose life’s work has been ground-breaking within the European art world and is awarded once every 5 years.  It takes its name from the Baroque painter Peter Paul Rubens.  Other notable Rubens prize winners include Francis Bacon, Sigmar Polke, Lucian Freud, Rupprecht Geiger, and Antoni Tàpies.

The Museum für Gegenwartskunst Siegen (Germany) is honoring Bridget Riley with an exhibition of her work to mark the occasion.